theodorepython.tumblr.com is probably written by a female somewhere between 66-100 years old. The writing style is personal and happy most of the time.

my entire philosophy on life can be boiled down to the phrase "I'd rather have it and not need it than need it and not have it"

he/him/his

[REDACTED]

feel free to ask for my skype
August 3rd
16:01
Via
freedying:

zoomine:

Solar Eclipse and Milky Way seen from ISS (International Space Station) 

LIFE IS TRULY AMAZING

freedying:

zoomine:

Solar Eclipse and Milky Way seen from ISS (International Space Station) 

LIFE IS TRULY AMAZING

January 7th
16:01
Via

samrgarrett:

namidayume:

scary-monsters-and-davesprite:

lonelyinsomniac:

samsaranmusing:

image

Orbital path of asteroid near miss in 2002. Yah, that’s how close we came to nuclear winter and possible total destruction.

A visitor.

It’s like it’s trying so hard to hit us and it just can’t do it

Too bad that’s not actually an asteroid

January 6th
23:40
Via
serendipitousramblings:

zawoesi:

Oh hey, not a big deal, but the hubble took a picture of a star that’s nearing supernova status 

DUUDE

serendipitousramblings:

zawoesi:

Oh hey, not a big deal, but the hubble took a picture of a star that’s nearing supernova status 

DUUDE

October 29th
14:57
Via

the-fury-of-a-time-lord:

losingmycool-bcsupernatural:

jtotheizzoe:

An important reminder that the universe has three spatial dimensions and is best appreciated with all three engaged*.

*engage fourth as needed for EXTREME MODE

god dammit people tag your porn

FUCK THIS IS SEXY

October 28th
12:22
Via
pyrrhiccomedy:


Astronomers have discovered the largest known structure in the universe, a clump of active galactic cores that stretch 4 billion light-years from end to end. The structure is a light quasar group (LQG), a collection of extremely luminous Galactic Nulcei powered by supermassive central black holes.

So that’s cool and everything, but maybe some of you would be interested to know why this is a significant find? Beyond just its record-setting bigness.
Since Einstein, physicists have accepted something called the Cosmological Principle, which states that the universe looks the same everywhere if you view it on a large enough scale. You might find some weird shit over here, and some other freaky shit over there, but if you pull back the camera far enough, you’ll find that same weird and/or freaky shit cropping up over and over again in a fairly regular distribution. This is because the universe is (probably) infinite in size and (we are pretty darn sure) has, and has always had, the same forces acting on it everywhere.
So why is this new LQG so radical? (It stands for ‘Large Quasar Group,’ btw, not ‘Light Quasar Group.’)
Well, let’s try to comprehend the scale we’re dealing with. A ‘megaparsec,’ written Mpc, is about 3.2 million light years long. The Milky Way is about 0.03 Mpc across (or 100,000 light years). The distance between our galaxy and Andromeda, our closest galactic neighbor, is 0.75 Mpc, or 2.5 million light years. LQGs are usually about 200 Mpc across. Assuming a logarithmic distribution of weird shit outliers (if you don’t know how logarithmic distribution curves work, don’t worry about it), cosmologists predicted that nothing in the universe should be more than 370 Mpc across.
This new LQG is 1200 Mpc long. That’s four billion light years. Four BILLION LIGHT YEARS. Just to travel from one side to the other of this one thing. I mean for fuck’s sake, the universe is only about 14 billion years old! How many of these things could there be? 
Right now it looks like the Cosmological Principle might be out the window, unless physicists can find some way to make the existence of this new LQG work with the math (and boy, are they trying). And that’s totally baffling. It would mean—well, we don’t have any idea what it would mean. That the universe isn’t essentially uniform? That some ‘special’ physics apply/applied in some places but not in others? That Something Happened that is totally outside our current ability to understand or quantify stuff happening?
By the way, no one lives there. The radiation from so many quasars would sterilize rock.
Sources: 1 2 3

pyrrhiccomedy:

Astronomers have discovered the largest known structure in the universe, a clump of active galactic cores that stretch 4 billion light-years from end to end. The structure is a light quasar group (LQG), a collection of extremely luminous Galactic Nulcei powered by supermassive central black holes.

So that’s cool and everything, but maybe some of you would be interested to know why this is a significant find? Beyond just its record-setting bigness.

Since Einstein, physicists have accepted something called the Cosmological Principle, which states that the universe looks the same everywhere if you view it on a large enough scale. You might find some weird shit over here, and some other freaky shit over there, but if you pull back the camera far enough, you’ll find that same weird and/or freaky shit cropping up over and over again in a fairly regular distribution. This is because the universe is (probably) infinite in size and (we are pretty darn sure) has, and has always had, the same forces acting on it everywhere.

So why is this new LQG so radical? (It stands for ‘Large Quasar Group,’ btw, not ‘Light Quasar Group.’)

Well, let’s try to comprehend the scale we’re dealing with. A ‘megaparsec,’ written Mpc, is about 3.2 million light years long. The Milky Way is about 0.03 Mpc across (or 100,000 light years). The distance between our galaxy and Andromeda, our closest galactic neighbor, is 0.75 Mpc, or 2.5 million light years. LQGs are usually about 200 Mpc across. Assuming a logarithmic distribution of weird shit outliers (if you don’t know how logarithmic distribution curves work, don’t worry about it), cosmologists predicted that nothing in the universe should be more than 370 Mpc across.

This new LQG is 1200 Mpc long. That’s four billion light years. Four BILLION LIGHT YEARS. Just to travel from one side to the other of this one thing. I mean for fuck’s sake, the universe is only about 14 billion years old! How many of these things could there be? 

Right now it looks like the Cosmological Principle might be out the window, unless physicists can find some way to make the existence of this new LQG work with the math (and boy, are they trying). And that’s totally baffling. It would mean—well, we don’t have any idea what it would mean. That the universe isn’t essentially uniform? That some ‘special’ physics apply/applied in some places but not in others? That Something Happened that is totally outside our current ability to understand or quantify stuff happening?

By the way, no one lives there. The radiation from so many quasars would sterilize rock.

Sources: 1 2 3

January 30th
13:34
Via
colchrishadfield:

Riding the edge of darkness, to beyond the horizon.

colchrishadfield:

Riding the edge of darkness, to beyond the horizon.

expose-the-light:

Hubble’s Latest Mind Blowing Cosmic Pictures

January 24th
21:08
Via
colchrishadfield:

Our atmosphere acts as a lens, distorting the sun as it crosses the horizon.

colchrishadfield:

Our atmosphere acts as a lens, distorting the sun as it crosses the horizon.

January 11th
13:01
Via

goobot:

rolalstrider:

maxistentialist:

More about the Hubble Ultra-Deep Field.

image

and yet some people still dont think there’s life on other planets

January 3rd
18:44
Via
doctor-lucky:

Not strictly true - this’ll only happen if the comet survives its close encounter with the Sun with enough volatiles intact to make a nice tail by the time it’s close to Earth, which isn’t guaranteed.
If it does survive, though, this is going to be the comet of the century, outshining the full moon at night and possibly visible during the day.

doctor-lucky:

Not strictly true - this’ll only happen if the comet survives its close encounter with the Sun with enough volatiles intact to make a nice tail by the time it’s close to Earth, which isn’t guaranteed.

If it does survive, though, this is going to be the comet of the century, outshining the full moon at night and possibly visible during the day.